EQ and self awareness

Do you know what you don't know about yourself?

"When you listen with empathy to another person, you give that person psychological air". 

Stephen R. Covey

In 1995, Daniel Goleman wrote, "In a high-IQ job pool, skills like discipline, drive, and empathy mark those who emerge as outstanding". 

His book, 'Emotional Intelligence' lay the blueprint for a sea-change in attitudes to what were traditionally labelled as 'soft' skills. They're as hard as it gets. 

Unlike personality, which is considered relatively stable over time, emotional intelligence skills can be learned and developed as people develop in their careers. In other words, you can get better at EQ. If IQ peaks at around 17 years old, EQ continues to develop until old age. It's a life-long journey.

However, the skills associated with EQ are like muscles. They need to be identified, isolated and exercised. It's hard work. The greatest leaders aren't great just because they are clever. They care and listen. They motivate. They adapt. They create and articulate purpose. 

The journey to EQ starts with self-awareness. The most inspiring leaders, managers and colleagues are self-aware. They care about their impact on others and are consistently interested in identifying their 'blind spots' for improvement and self-management.

We work with individuals and groups to:

  • Unpick what EQ actually is - what does it look like and why is it important? 

  • Understand the basic neuroscience behind EQ and how it plays out in behaviour.

  • Explore personality styles and the related behaviours (using a variety of tools) to increase self-awareness.

  • Explore the constituent components of EQ - what can you do with your new-found self-awareness to increase your effectiveness?

  • Examine the situations where EQ is most challenged and understand what can be done to mitigate the risk of relationship damage.

  • Practice and rehearse situations where EQ is most required - as identified by those 'in the room'/121.

© 2019 - SW Learning Ltd